Sunday, June 05, 2011

Greener Dream of Bajo

Bajo has as many trees as twenty schools in Thimphu could dream for and all the thanks to its alumni who had spared no June 2 since 1997. It's sad that the day is no more a national holiday but Bajo has no hard feelings against whoever is responsible. We have enough tree to breath for next hundred years.

Bajo Campus!
But not all part of Wangdue is as lucky. The magnificent dzong is exposed to the full fury of the wind, which has left it as the last dzong without CGI roof. Everything around the dzong points in the direction of the wind. There is hardly any tree left to shield the massive structure from the wind, and therefore over three hundred students from Bajo School joined the foresters and Dzong project workers in planting over thousand tree saplings around the dzong. If the wind would spare it, in next twenty years you would see how beautiful Wangdue dzong looks in the green wood rather than wild cactus.
Bajo Students on the mission!

5 comments:

  1. Hi PaSsu,
    Congratulation. Please convey my appreciation to your students.
    Looks like great job done. Yeah! Wangdue Dzong would look spectacular amidst the green trees. As envisioned by you, trees might probably reduce the impact of winds that Dzong faces today.
    Just curious, What species of trees did you plant? It would be interesting to know as the area nearby Dzong looks unfavorable to quite a good number of tree species from a distance, if we draw conclusion of soil profile from current vegetation cover (Cactus).
    Cheers.

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  2. Hi PaSsu,
    Great going. Yes, like Sangay, I would like to know what tree saplings have been planted. You do not want to find, years from now, that wrong tree species have been planted. The plantation of poplar trees in Thimphu decades ago is a point in case. A clear case of a good intention wrong totally wrong.

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  3. Yeah Bajo school is evergreen and its nice to hear that this year the focus has been diverted towards the Historic Wangdue dzong. With help from the foresters there I am sure that the tree species they plated will be the correct one. Great job Bajo school.Keep going Passu sir. :)

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  4. Thank you guys.
    @ Sangay,rampage of Cactus can't be explained logically, I think it was introduced by mistake, therefore it may not be a good scale to measure the soil profile.
    Well Sangay and Yeshey, I saw them planting two varieties of trees, one I am sure is Cypress and other looked like Oak.
    @Letho, Thanks. Tell me your greener dream, since you are a forester.

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  5. Thank God it is not Poplar!

    I love oak - during spring when they start to bud, the color of green is soooooooooooo delicate and gentle and so tender like the skin of a new born baby. We use to have a cluster of oak trees below the road approaching Sinisa towards Chunzom .. it is now gone and I feel so sad every time I pass that spot which is now devoid of the trees.

    Even as we speak of conservation, we systamatically brutalize it. I think the problem is that we do things unthinkingly - somehow I get the feeling that we fail to put as much passion into what we do, as much as we do when we speak about something.

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